Blog Archives

‘The Remains of the Day’ [Kazuo Ishiguro]: Essay Six [19 out of 25, 2001/2002]

Image of the first marked page of Chris Larham's 45-minute timed essay on 'The Remains of the Day' (19 out of 25 grading, 2001/2002).

Ishiguro uses many techniques to elicit an intense emotional response from the reader. For example, there is a wide employment of dramatic irony: we often have more insight than the narrator, Stevens, into his own experiences. This is shown when Miss Kenton declares that she has been proposed to – we make the link that she wants Stevens to say “Don’t marry him, marry me”, and sweep her off her feet; unfortunately Stevens does not make this inference. Thus, the reader feels frustrated at Stevens’ short-sightedness and lack of perception.[…]

Tagged with: ,
Posted in A Level English [A2]

‘The Remains of the Day’ [Kazuo Ishiguro]: Essay Five [“A-” grading, 2001/2002]

Image of the first marked page of Chris Larham's 'The Remains of the Day' essay ('A-' grading, 2001/2002).

Mr Farraday is introduced to us early on in the novel, with Stevens relating the reasons behind his journey – Mr Farraday was the man who prompted Stevens to undertake his trip, saying, “Why don’t you take the car and drive off somewhere for a few days? You look like you could make good use of a break.” This is clearly one of Mr Farraday’s roles in the novel: the man who opens the door for Stevens’ reminiscences and self-development.[…]

Tagged with: ,
Posted in A Level English [A2]

‘The Remains of the Day’ [Kazuo Ishiguro]: Essay Four [‘B’ grading, 2001/2002]

Image of the second and final marked page of Chris Larham's essay on 'The Remains of the Day' ('B' grading 2001/2002).

In this section of the novel, Mr and Mrs Wakefield visit Mr Farraday to inspect his “acquisition”, Darlington Hall. Mrs Wakefield questions the genuineness of the “arch” in the hall, proceeds to tap Stevens for information concerning Lord Darlington, and leaves Mr Farraday disappointed, “Mrs Wakefield wasn’t as impressed with this house as I believe she ought to have been.” The ‘incident’ which advances our understanding of Stevens is his blatant denial of ever working for Lord Darlington, “I didn’t madam, no.”[…]

Tagged with: ,
Posted in A Level English [A2]

‘The Remains of the Day’ [Kazuo Ishiguro]: Essay Three [‘B’ grading, 2001/2002]

Image of the third and final marked page of Chris Larham's essay on Kazuo Ishiguro's 'The Remains of the Day' ('B' grading, 2001/2002).

Through the use of the 1923 conference, Ishiguro is able to emphasise the changing social and political beliefs of that time. His characters Lord Darlington and Stevens underline the clinging to ‘old ways’ and trusty thinking in this time of change – what Lord Darlington likes to call ‘honour’. Mr Lewis challenges the methods employed by Lord Darlington, seeing them as acts of ‘amateurism’.[…]

Tagged with: ,
Posted in A Level English [A2]

‘The Remains of the Day’ [Kazuo Ishiguro]: Essay Two [‘A’-grade, 2001/2002]

Image of the second marked page of Chris Larham's 'The Remains of the Day' essay ('A' grade, 2001/2002).

From the beginning of the novel, Stevens uses convoluted syntax in his attempt to justify and qualify everything he does. For example, his desire to see Miss Kenton again is purely down to a “preoccupation with these very same professional matters”. He also admits that he has “been responsible for a series of small errors in the carrying out of my duties” – his wish to sound respectable prevents him using a more vernacular description of his failings. In this way, Ishiguro appears to be building up a character that is very insecure of himself and is worried about what others think of him.[…]

Tagged with: ,
Posted in A Level English [A2]

THE REMAINS OF THE DAY [Kazuo Ishiguro]: Essay One [‘B+’-grading, 2001/2002]

Image of the essay plan drawn up for Chris Larham's piece of writing on 'The Remains of the Day' (2001/2002, B+).

One significant conversation is related to us by Stevens, as he analyses a story which made a lasting impression on his father. “Concerning a certain butler who had travelled with his employer to India and served there for many years…”, the particular quote which has significance is: […]

Tagged with: ,
Posted in A Level English [A2]