Blog Archives

Descriptive Writing Assignment {Positive and Negative Descriptions} [‘A*’-grading, 2000/2001]

An image of the sixth and final marked page of Chris Larham's descriptive writing essay and commentary ['A*'-grading, 2000/2001].

In this piece of descriptive writing, there are two accounts of the events leading up to a Marilyn Mansun ‘gig’: the queuing; the stadium; the weather; the atmosphere; and the man himself… The first description praises the place and the people, whereas the second account is an example of how a piece of writing can condemn; criticising both the place and the people encountered.

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Posted in AS Level English [A1]

Essay on Idiomatic Malapropisms and Irony [‘A*’-grading, 2000/2001]

Image of the first marked page of Chris Larham's essay on idiomatic malapropisms and irony ['A*'-grading, 2000/2001].

This piece of creative writing explores the phenomenon of the ‘malapropism’. [‘A*’-grading, 2000/2001]

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Posted in AS Level English [A1]

Linguistic Analysis: Essay One [ungraded, 2000/2001]

Image of the first marked page of Chris Larham's linguistic analysis of an excerpt from John Pilger's 'Heroes' [ungraded, 2000/2001].

The tone of the piece relates the feelings of some White Americans towards the Indians; a general lack of respect is apparent early on, reflected through the absence of serious thought for the Indians. Through the re-telling of the ‘Colonel Kit Carson’ tale, Pilger puts across the idea that Indians are second-class citizens – that they deserve to feel ‘ignominy’ and terrible living conditions: this was the army officer’s view, obviously. Throughout history there has been disdain for the Indians.[…]

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Posted in AS Level English [A1]

Poetry Analysis: Essay Six [22 out of 25, 2000/2001]

Image of the first marked page of Chris Larham's essay on 'The Collar' [22 out of 25, 2000/2001].

Drawing heavily on the traditions of his contemporary metaphysical poets, George Herbert passionately relates a turning point in his life in “The Collar”. Herbert attempts to convey his inner angst at the crossroads of his life, with the theme of religion a prominent feature of the poem.[…]

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Posted in AS Level English [A1]

Poetry Analysis: Essay Five [25 out of 25, 2000/2001]

Image of the second marked page of Chris Larham's essay on 'There's a Certain Slant of Light' and 'God's Grandeur' [25 out of 25, 2000/2001].

Using unorthodox typographical features in abundance, Emily Dickinson’s Victorian poem, “There’s A Certain Slant Of Light”, cryptically relates an intangible unhappiness “That oppresses”, perhaps reflecting her manic-depressive personality.[…]

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Posted in AS Level English [A1]

Poetry Analysis: Essay Four [22 out of 25, 2000/2001]

Image of the first marked page of Chris Larham's essay on 'Kubla Kahn', 'Dover Beach', and 'Spellbound' (22 out of 25, 2000/2001).

Samuel Taylor Coleridge uses “Kubla Khan”, an ancient warrior, as the vehicle through which the description is relayed in the poem (similar to the ‘traveller from an antique land’, which Shelley employs in ‘Ozymandias’); it was Khan who did ‘decree’ this particular place.[…]

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Posted in AS Level English [A1]

Poetry Analysis: Essay Three [23 out of 25, 2000/2001]

Image of the fifth and final marked page of Chris Larham's poetry essay (23 out of 25, 2000/2001).

Throughout ‘To Virgins’, Robert Herrick employs an ‘abab’ rhyme scheme, coupled with an ‘8787’ syllable mix, in each of the four compact stanzas, to put forward his ‘while you’ve got it, flaunt it’ message. Versification is very ordered throughout the poem; Herrick knows what he wants to say, and the desired tone in which to say it – this assuredness in his own mind helps make the poem more persuasive. The stanzas are all one-sentence long, with a colon or a semi-colon joining the two contrasting parts after the opening two lines (the apparently limitless youthful opportunities in love and relationships/the aged loss of beauty and chances). Written from a third person perspective, ‘To Virgins’ comes across in a fun, playful ballad form that is reminiscent of youth. Such a free-flowing style makes the idea of losing one’s virginity seem trivial – not the massive, life-changing event that it is usually considered-and advised- to be. Herrick uses this style to good effect: in using it to convey his words of advice, the virgins will think that love and relationships are something to be enjoyed while youth is on their side; the ease with which the poem runs will encourage them to relax and enjoy themselves.[…]

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Posted in AS Level English [A1]